Tag Archives: the persian room

Time Out #27

The Plaza Gets Ready to Celebrate 110 Years

This is so cool…  I didn’t even know that the Plaza Hotel was doing this.  Special rates, special perks, and a copy of my newest book, Starring the Plaza!!!  Check out the ad and book your room today.

 

Celebrate 110 – The Plaza, A Fairmont Managed Hotel


 

234 Playboy Laughs with Patty Farmer

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Patty Farmer is an entertainment historian who has authored the new book ‘Playboy Laughs’ chronicling the history involving Playboy magazine and stand up comedy. The recently deceased Dick Gregory got his big break performing at the Playboy club in Chicago and used to have to take the bus to get there because he was so broke when he started. For all the criticism that has fallen on Hugh Hefner for being sexist he doesn’t get enough credit for breaking the color barrier in terms of hiring performers at his clubs and models for his magazine at a time when the United States was racially segregated. In this episode we talk about my own personal history with Playboy magazine and how the Playboy interviews were a very important part of my entertainment apprenticeship. We discuss the rise of George Carlin and Lenny Bruce who performed at the Playboy clubs and which entertainer who couldn’t keep his hands to himself. This important period in American entertainment history and the history of American censorship is but a distant memory for those who remember and this is a conversation I was happy to capture for the Smart Camp audience. So put on your bunny ears and you fluffy slippers and find out why the  Playboy empire was a crucial component in the history of American comedy. It is my pleasure to present to you now the one and only Patty Farmer!

To enjoy the conversation that I had with the wonderful Tom Rhodes on Tom Rhodes radio, click here.


 

Back with New Books Network to discuss Starring the Plaza – Pt. II

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Joel W. Tscherne, Host of New Books in Film talks with Author Patty Farmer about her latest book, Starring the Plaza: Hollywood, Broadway and High Society Visit the Worlds Favorite Hotel.

To listen to part II of this II part interview, click here.


 

Lonnie Shorr

Lonnie Shorr

Lonnie Shorr

 

The southern comedian, Lonnie Shorr—whose delivery has often been compared in the tradition of Will Rodgers—worked the Playboy circuit for two straight years. He told us, “I’m glad I did! It was a great learning experience and an opportunity to perfect your act —although you never really reach perfection.

 

“I found my niche working for Playboy because you did so many shows for them. It was a ‘floating‘ schedule because usually you did two shows a night. But if the last show had an attendance of fifteen percent of the room capacity, you had to do another show! In other words, if the room sat a hundred people and you had fifteen people in the audience—you did another show. So theoretically, you could be doing a lot of shows!

 

Lonnie Short and Juliet Prowse

Lonnie Short and Juliet Prowse

 

“One thing about Playboy that was different from the way things are today is that you couldn’t use four letter words. Nobody did that. If you did, you had an unfavorable report written about you. This report was sent to the company headquarters in Chicago, and if you received too many bad write-ups you were dropped from the circuit, and no one wanted that. There were guys that were a little suggestive, but no cursing.

 

“The Playboy Clubs were one of the few places we worked that had standards, very high standards for everyone—the staff, the Bunnies, and the entertainers. The other day, I had a guy from one of our local newspapers ask me about the entertainment scene today, and I told him I thought that the  Playboy principle of entertainment was what they needed today in some of these other clubs.

 

The Playboy Clubs always had two acts—once in awhile they’d have three acts in the bigger clubs. It was a place where you could go and see a show and, at that time the prices were really nominal –then you could go downstairs and listen to some music while actually talking to the person you were with. That’s the kind of place we could use nowadays.”

 

Lonnie Shorr

Lonnie Shorr

 

You can read more stories in my books Playboy Swings and The Persian Room Presents

 


 

Roslyn Kind

Roslyn Kind

Roslyn Kind

In 1969, Roslyn was booked for an engagement at the Plaza Hotel’s legendary Persian Room—an accomplishment on any level but especially for an unknown eighteen year old. “I celebrated my nineteenth birthday during my Persian Room run,” Roslyn told me. The critics wrote that ‘she brought a youthful essence that was never known to that room.’ “I did songs like ‘Promises, Promises’ and ‘Hair’ because I was young and wasn’t going to do older songs. I was a little out of whack, with a whole different energy than they were used to. I was determined not to do stuff someone else was known for.

“There was a huge amount of pressure on me at the Persian Room because it was not only my New York debut, but also my first major introduction to both the public and the critics. The plan was for me to go out and make a big splash on my own, without the mention of Barbra Streisand—my mega- superstar sister. I needed time to develop as a performer without that attachment and comparison. Then I did The Ed Sullivan Show, and someone from my record company leaked it to the media. So then I had to evolve in full sight of everybody. On top of that, the Persian Room wasn’t like the little clubs—the ones in the village where you started without the rigamorole. This was major press and major people wanting to come and see and gasp. I had to live up to a lot of things I wasn’t ready to live up to.”

Roslyn Kind and Barbra Streisand

Roslyn Kind and Barbra Streisand

Ros told me about what it was like, working out of town to prepare her show for the big New York Show. “One night, while I was working at a club called the CopaHavan in Oklahoma City,” she began, “a big fight broke out. These drunken guys had stayed for both shows, and when they heard the same songs in my second show they got very pissed. We told them we were trying to break in a show for New York, and we had to do this material as much as possible.  They were just not having it, and a big Western-style brawl broke out. I swear, people were flying over the banisters and over the bar, and my musical director signaled me to leave the stage by a different route. These guys were so rude and out of control the police had to be called in.

“Afterward, I saw my manager. He had been hit in the nose and his glasses were broken. He told me not to tell his wife. I had to laugh and replied, ‘You won’t have to say a word. She’s going to look at your nose and face, and she’ll know!’ That was my experience, in some of the towns in Oklahoma and Texas on the road leading up to the Persian Room. Thank God in New York you had maitre d’s to keep the weirdo’s at a distance.”

Roslyn went on to sing at other major settings around the world, seasoned by her early experiences—both on the road and at the Persian Room. “Someone once asked me,” she said, “‘What’s the difference between working a small room and a major venue?’ I said the trick is to make the humongous room feel like a small, intimate room. That’s my job. That’s why I’m here.”

Roslyn Kind and Barbra Steisand

Roslyn Kind and Barbra Steisand

 

You can read more stories in my books Playboy Swings and The Persian Room Presents

 


 

 

Mitzi Gaynor

mitzi gaymor

I was thrilled to have the opportunity to chat with actress, singer, and dancer Mitzi Gaynor recently. Gaynor began her career in 1942 as a dancer in Song Without Words.  During the late 1950s, she landed a slew of sought-after roles that paired her with Hollywood’s leading men, including Bing Crosby and Donald O’Connor in Anything Goes (1956), Gene Kelly in Les Girls, and Frank Sinatra in The Joker is Wild (both 1957).

In 1958, Gaynor won the plum role of Nellie Forbush in the eagerly anticipated film version of the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical South Pacific.  She then hosted a string of successful annual musical TV specials in the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Her best performance was arguably her show-stopping appearance at the 39th Academy Awards where her singing and dancing “Georgy Girl” stopped the show. The Academy had a hard time getting the audience to sit down and stop applauding.

Gaynor is now in her 80’s and still touring!

I had to share some stunning photos of Gaynor from her role in Les Girls and more. It is clear why she is known for her legs!

mitzi gaynor

mitzi gaynor les girls

mitzi gaynor

 

You can read more stories in my books Playboy Swings and The Persian Room Presents

 


 

Why Carol Channing Was Always Late…

carol channing the plaza persian room

“I was always late getting on stage at the Persian Room because I found myself sampling the food that was set out for the talent. I don’t usually like to eat on stage but often the temptation and my hunger made a formidable combination and many times delay my entrance!” -Carol Channing

 

You can read more stories in my books Playboy Swings and The Persian Room Presents